What happened to the captain of the Korean ferry Sewol?

What happened to the captain of the Korean ferry Sewol?

An appeals court has sentenced the South Korean captain of the Sewol ferry to life in prison on a murder charge, strengthening an earlier conviction. Lee Joon-seok was at the helm when the ferry went down in April 2014 killing more than 300 people, mostly children.

Is the captain of Sewol ferry still in jail?

South Korean ferry sinks – Sewol ferry captain Lee Joon-Seok was acquitted of murder, avoiding a death sentence, but was sentenced to 36 years in jail on November 11 for his role in the maritime disaster that killed more than 300.

Who are still missing in Sewol ferry?

Despite the hull’s search being completed, five victims of the sinking remain undiscovered: male Danwon High School students Nam Hyeon-cheol and Park Yeong-in, teacher Yang Seung-jin, and Kwon Jae-geun and his son Hyeok-gyu.

How many kids survived the Sewol ferry?

Survivors of South Korea’s Sewol ferry disaster have begun testifying against the captain and crew. The passenger ferry capsized on 16 April, killing 304 of the 476 people on board. More than 300 passengers were Danwon High School pupils on an organised trip, but only 75 students survived.

Who is the captain of the South Korean ferry that sank?

The captain of a South Korean ferry that capsized and sank this week has been arrested, with two crew members. Lee Joon-seok, 69, faces charges including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law.

What happened to the captain of the Sewol ferry?

Sewol Ferry Captain Lee Joon-seok: “I am sorry to the people of South Korea” The captain of a South Korean ferry that capsized and sank this week has been arrested, with two crew members. Lee Joon-seok, 69, faces charges including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law.

Who is Lee Joon-seok and what are his charges?

Lee Joon-seok, 69, faces charges including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law. Amid suggestions he delayed evacuation, Mr Lee said that he feared passengers would “drift away” if they left the ferry “without proper judgement”.

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